For Whom the Bell Tolls

Buy FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS by Ernest Hemingway

In four days’ time, a ragtag gang of Spanish partisans – communists, gypsies, women, old men – will play their part in the civil war between republicans and fascists by blowing up a bridge. History will probably never remember this minor contribution (especially if the republicans lose), and most of those hiding in the forest, waiting for the hour, are well aware of their general insignificance.

The same is true of American Robert Jordan, a volunteer fighting for a cause he just about still believes in, sent up the hill because of his experience with dynamite. It’s not necessarily true of Maria, a woman who watched her parents executed before being raped by fascists, and who Jordan falls instantly in love with.

With a portentous sense that their time together may be short, Jordan need not worry about the other, less beautiful side of love. Four days is long enough to feel lust and longing. Maria becomes both true love and wife, and in another way his sister, because he has never had any of those things, and may otherwise never have them.

He’s well aware that his new, heightened sense of being alive may be him just being oversensitive, and that time hasn’t really become meaningless, but if these are going to be his final days on earth, he’d rather spend it amongst the trees with Maria than arguing with the drunk Pablo, who has his doubts about their mission – and who knows where the detonators are hidden.

There were times when I struggled with this in a way I never found it a struggle to get through A Farewell to Arms (admittedly that was some 18 years ago, and I was a different reader back then). I read it in bursts, on and off over several years, contemplating on a few occasions whether to give up on it altogether, but remembering how I almost did that with A Tale of Two Cities, only for the second half to be so much better than the first. Then there would be interludes such as the one where fascist prisoners are forced to run a gauntlet of all the village before having to jump off a cliff to their deaths. So I persevered, and it too got better as the hours the partisans have left run out.

It was impossible for me not to make further comparisons with A Farewell to Arms too. Jordan was only slightly more demonstrative than Frederic Henry, and Maria was only slightly less of a blank sheet than Catherine (though her dialogue was generally less barmy). It’s not a particularly convincing romance, purely circumstantial, but that’s probably the point. Despite the disparate nature of the guerrilla band, everyone there except Jordan and Maria seems to belong. It is Hemingway’s most romantic notion – that two outsiders will find each other (and find love) whilst there’s still time.

I sometimes turn corners of pages (I know, I know) when a writer has written something particularly worth returning to. I must have had portents of my own a year or so back when I turned one such corner on the page where one of the partisans asks Jordan whether there are any fascists in America and he says, ‘There are many who do not know they are fascists but will find it out when the time comes.’ I’m not so sure they will, Robert.